top of page

Writers Community

Public·49 members
Robert Green
Robert Green

Buy Vitamin B3 Niacin


All B vitamins help the body convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which the body uses to produce energy. These B vitamins, often referred to as B-complex vitamins, also help the body use fats and protein. B-complex vitamins are needed for a healthy liver, healthy skin, hair, and eyes, and to help the nervous system function properly.




buy vitamin b3 niacin


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2ufZSs&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw3cRlie_wbDiDMg5lGpo-hK



Severe deficiency can cause a condition known as pellagra. Pellagra is characterized by cracked, scaly skin, dementia, and diarrhea. It is generally treated with a nutritionally balanced diet and niacin supplements. Niacin deficiency also causes burning in the mouth and a swollen, bright red tongue.


Very high doses of B3, available by prescription, have been studied to prevent or improve symptoms of the following conditions. However, at high doses niacin can be toxic. You should not take doses higher than the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) except under your doctor's supervision. Researchers are trying to determine if inositol hexanicotinate has similar benefits without serious side effects. But results are inconclusive.


Niacin, but not niacinamide, has been used since the 1950s to lower elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglyceride (fat) levels in the blood. However, side effects can be unpleasant and even dangerous. High doses of niacin cause:


A time-release form of niacin reduces flushing. But long-term use is associated with liver damage. In addition, niacin can interact with other cholesterol-lowering medicines. You should not take niacin at high doses without your doctor's supervision.


In another study, people with heart disease and high cholesterol who took niacin along with simvastatin (Zocor) had a lower risk of having a first heart attack or stroke. Their risk of death was also lower. In another study, men who took niacin alone seemed to reduce the risk of having a second heart attack, although it did not reduce the risk of death.


Researchers have also looked at whether high-dose niacinamide might reduce the risk of type 1 diabetes in children at risk for the disease. One study found that it did. But another, larger study found it did not protect against developing type 1 diabetes. More research is needed.


The effect of niacin on type 2 diabetes is more complicated. People with type 2 diabetes often have high levels of fats and cholesterol in the blood. Niacin, often along with other medications, can lower those levels. However, niacin may also raise blood sugar levels, which is particularly dangerous for someone with diabetes. For that reason, if you have diabetes, you should take niacin only under the direction of your doctor, and you should be carefully monitored for high blood sugar.


One preliminary study suggested that niacinamide may improve arthritis symptoms, including increasing joint mobility and reducing the amount of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) needed. More research is needed.


Alzheimer disease: Population studies show that people who get higher levels of niacin in their diet have a lower risk of Alzheimer disease. No studies have evaluated niacin supplements, however.


Skin conditions: Researchers are studying topical forms of niacin as treatments for rosacea, aging, and prevention of skin cancer, although it is too early to know whether it is effective.


Niacin is available as a tablet or capsule in both regular and timed-release forms. The timed-release tablets and capsules may have fewer side effects than regular niacin. However, the timed-release versions are more likely to cause liver damage. Regardless of which form of niacin you are using, doctors recommend periodic liver function tests when using high doses (above 100 mg per day) of niacin.


Generally, high doses of niacin are used to control specific diseases. Such high doses must be prescribed by a doctor who will increase the amount of niacin slowly, over the course of 4 to 6 weeks. Take niacin with meals to avoid stomach irritation.


High doses (50 mg or more) of niacin can cause side effects. The most common side effect is called "niacin flush," which is a burning, tingling sensation in the face and chest, and red or flushed skin. Taking an aspirin 30 minutes prior to the niacin may help reduce this symptom.


People with a history of liver disease, kidney disease, or stomach ulcers should not take niacin supplements. Those with diabetes or gallbladder disease should do so only under the close supervision of their doctors.


Taking any one of the B vitamins for a long period of time can result in an imbalance of other important B vitamins. For this reason, you may want to take a B-complex vitamin, which includes all the B vitamins.


Because of its impact on the liver, vitamin B3 can interact with several medications. If you are currently taking medications, or regularly drink alcohol, you should not use niacin without talking to your health care provider first. Below is a partial list of medications that may interact with vitamin B3.


Antibiotics, tetracycline: Niacin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should be taken at different times from tetracycline.


Anti-seizure medications: Phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakote) may cause niacin deficiency in some people. Taking niacin with carbamazepine (Tegretol) or mysoline (Primidone) may increase levels of these medications in the body.


Cholesterol-lowering medications: Niacin binds the cholesterol-lowering medications known as bile-acid sequestrants and may make them less effective. For this reason, niacin and these medications should be taken at different times of the day. Bile-acid sequestrants include colestipol (Colestid), colesevelam (Welchol), and cholestyramine (Questran).


Statins: Some scientific evidence suggests that taking niacin with simvastatin (Zocor) appears to slow the progression of heart disease. However, the combination may also increase the likelihood for serious side effects, such as muscle inflammation or liver damage.


Diabetes medications: Niacin may increase blood sugar levels. People taking insulin, metformin (Glucophage), glyburide (Dibeta, Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), or other medications used to treat high blood glucose levels should monitor their blood sugar levels closely when taking niacin supplements.


AIM-HIGH Investigators. The role of niacin in raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and optimally treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol Rationale and study design. The Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic syndrome with low HDL/high triglycerides: Impact on Global Health outcomes (AIM-HIGH). Am Heart J. 2011 Mar;161(3):471-477.e2.


Elam M, Hunninghake DB, Davis KB, et al. Effects of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein levels and glycemic control in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial disease: the ADMIT study: a randomized trial. Arterial Disease Multiple Intervention Trial. JAMA. 2000;284:1263-1270.


RDA: Niacin is measured in milligrams (mg) of niacin equivalents (NE). One NE equals 1 milligram of niacin or 60 mg of tryptophan. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults 19+ years is 16 mg NE for men, 14 mg NE for women, 18 mg NE for pregnant women, and 17 mg NE for lactating women.


UL: The Tolerable Upper Intake Level is the maximum daily intake unlikely to cause harmful effects on health. The UL for niacin for all adults 19+ years is 35 milligrams.


Nicotinic acid supplements contain high amounts, up to 1,000-2,000 mg of niacin taken daily. Studies have shown that they can increase HDL cholesterol and lower LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. However, negative side effects (skin flushing, stomach upset, diarrhea) usually accompany the supplements, resulting in poor compliance from patients. Clinical trials have not consistently shown that nicotinic acid leads to less cardiovascular events or deaths from CVD.


A severe niacin deficiency has been associated with cognitive decline such as memory loss and dementia. Niacin is believed to protect brain cells from stress and injury. It is not yet clear though if smaller variations in dietary niacin intake can negatively affect brain function.


A niacin deficiency is rare in the United States and other industrialized countries because it is well-absorbed from most foods (with the exception of some cereal grains in which niacin is bound to its fibers, decreasing the absorption) and is added to many foods and multivitamins. A severe niacin deficiency leads to pellagra, a condition that causes a dark, sometimes scaly rash to develop on skin areas exposed to sunlight; bright redness of the tongue; and constipation/diarrhea. Other signs of severe niacin deficiency include:


Toxicity when eating foods containing niacin is rare, but can occur from long-term use of high-dose supplements. A reddened skin flush with itchiness or tingling on the face, arms, and chest is a common sign. Flushing occurs mainly when taking high-dosage supplements in the form of nicotinic acid, rather than nicotinamide. Niacin taken in large doses as supplements may also increase uric acid levels, which is a risk factor for gout.


Summary Chicken breast is an excellent source of lean protein and niacin, containing 71% and 81% of the RDA for men and women, respectively. In comparison, chicken thighs provide roughly half that amount.


Summary Turkey contains both niacin and tryptophan, the latter of which your body can turn into niacin. Together they provide roughly 50% of the RDA for niacin for men and 60% of the RDA for women. Tryptophan also impacts mood and sleep.


Summary Wild-caught salmon is a good source of niacin, providing over half of the RDA for men and women per serving. Additionally, it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for heart health. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

  • interestopedia
  • Cannabis Weed
    Cannabis Weed
  • Jameson Price
    Jameson Price
  • Luke Bell
    Luke Bell
  • Hector Isaev
    Hector Isaev
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page