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Luke Bell
Luke Bell

Frogs Into Princes


In the tale, a spoiled princess reluctantly befriends the Frog Prince, whom she met after dropping a golden ball into a pond under a linden tree, and he retrieves it for her in exchange for her friendship. The Frog Prince, who is under a wicked fairy (or sorcerer)'s spell, magically transforms back into a handsome prince. In the original Grimm version of the story, the frog's spell was broken when the princess threw the frog against the wall, at which he transformed back into a prince, while in modern versions the transformation is triggered by the princess kissing the frog.[6]




Frogs Into Princes



In his essay, "On Fairy Stories," Tolkien writes that in fairy stories there is a notion "that the life or strength of a man or creature may reside in some other place or thing; or in some part of the body (especially the heart) that can be detached and hidden." Tolkien is writing about the existence of the soul, which is separate from the corporal body, but he also claims that fairy tales are not simply for entertainment. Fairy tales feed the soul. They also explore the complexities of relationships, reveal a set of beliefs about a world that still exists within our own world today, and teach children about the possibilities of life. These are often cautionary tales of fate and fortune, stories about maturation, about danger, and about how to make good choices. Fairy tales explore the boundaries of human experience. Children are sent into dark and frightening woods, where they must conquer their fears. Women are imprisoned and must use their wits to escape, while young men are sent on impossible quests from which they emerge as victors. Fairy tales provide lessons about love between parent and child, between men and women, and between subject and ruler, but they also include stories about jealousy, death, mutilation and torture, sexual assault, child abuse, and extreme poverty. We all recognize the characters types: goblins, witches, frogs that turn into princes and princes who are really disguised frogs, wicked step-mothers, and beautiful princesses. Although many students have grown up with Walt Disney adaptations of fairy tales, this course will re-introduce students to the classic fairy tales of the Grimm Brothers, Charles Perrault, and Hans Christian Anderson. In this class we will discuss the historical construction of childhood, the purpose of children's literature, strategies for writing fairy tales, and the societal and cultural values revealed in fairy tales. Student comments on evaluations about this class: "Amazing class! Required a lot of thinking outside-the-box." "I really enjoyed modern retellings and how these stories were both intriguing and relevant." "Interesting course and the discussions were really in depth." "I only knew about Disney and learned so much much about fairy tales." "Would definitely take again." "This is the best class ever! I would take this class again if I could." Text: Tatar, The Classic Fairy Tales


Hardly were the words out of her mouth than Parsley was changed into a toad and vanished from their sight. The Princes, now that the cause of their dispute was removed, put up their swords, kissed each other affectionately, and returned to their father.


'Prince, I will certainly help you,' said the toad, and, crawling back into her swamp, she returned dragging after her a piece of linen not bigger than a finger, which she lay before the Prince, saying, 'Take this home, and you'll see it will help you.'


The Prince had no wish to take such an insignificant bundle with him; but he didn't like to hurt Puddocky's feelings by refusing it, so he took up the little packet, put it in his pocket, and bade the little toad farewell. Puddocky watched the Prince till he was out of sight and then crept back into the water.


The father embraced his fortunate son, and commanded the rest of the linen to be thrown into the water; then, turning to his children he said, 'Now, dear Princes, prepare yourselves for the second task. You must bring me back a little dog that will go comfortably into a walnut-shell.'


The Prince, who this time never doubted the little toad's power to help him, told her his difficulty at once. 'Prince, I will help you,' said the toad again, and crawled back into her swamp as fast as her short little legs would carry her. She returned, dragging a hazel nut behind her, which she laid at the Prince's feet and said, 'Take this nut home with you and tell your father to crack it very carefully, and you'll see then what will happen.' The Prince thanked her heartily and went on his way in the best of spirits, while the little puddock crept slowly back into the water.


When the Prince got home he found his brothers had just arrived with great waggon-loads of little dogs of all sorts. The King had a walnut shell ready, and the trial began; but not one of the dogs the two eldest sons had brought with them would in the least fit into the shell. When they had tried all their little dogs, the youngest son handed his father the hazel-nut, with a modest bow, and begged him to crack it carefully. Hardly had the old King done so than a lovely tiny dog sprang out of the nutshell, and ran about on the King's hand, wagging its tail and barking lustily at all the other little dogs. The joy of the Court was great. The father again embraced his fortunate son, commanded the rest of the small dogs to be thrown into the water and drowned, and once more addressed his sons. 'The two most difficult tasks have been performed. Now listen to the third and last: whoever brings the fairest wife home with him shall be my heir.'


The youngest was very depressed this time and said to himself, 'Anything else Puddocky could have helped me in, but this task is quite beyond her power. How could she ever find a beautiful wife for me? Her swamps are wide and empty, and no human beings dwell there; only frogs and toads and other creatures of that sort.' However, he sat down as usual under the bridge, and this time he sighed from the bottom of his heart.


The Prince then told her the task they had been set to do. 'I'll help you right enough, my dear Prince,' said the little toad; 'just you go home, and I'll soon follow you.' With these words, Puddocky, with a spring quite unlike her usual slow movements, jumped into the water and disappeared.


The Prince rose up and went sadly on his way, for he didn't believe it possible that the little toad could really help him in his present difficulty. He had hardly gone a few steps when he heard a sound behind him, and, looking round, he saw a carriage made of cardboard, drawn by six big rats, coming towards him. Two hedgehogs rode in front as outriders, and on the box sat a fat mouse as coachman, and behind stood two little frogs as footmen. In the carriage itself sat Puddocky, who kissed her hand to the Prince out of the window as she passed by.


The old King was delighted, and embraced his thrice fortunate son and his new daughter-in-law tenderly, and appointed them as his successors to the throne. But he commanded the other women to be thrown into the water and drowned, like the bales of linen and the little dogs. The Prince married Puddocky and reigned long and happily with her, and if they aren't dead I suppose they are living still. 041b061a72


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