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Mason Perez
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Power Surfacing For Solidwork 2013: Tips and Tricks for Sub-D Modeling in SolidWorks



Power Surfacing for SolidWorks 2013: A Revolutionary Industrial Design Add-in




If you are a SolidWorks user who needs to create complex freeform shapes with smooth surfaces, you may have encountered some challenges with the traditional surface modeling tools. You may have struggled to patch trimmed surfaces together, avoid unwanted wrinkles and gaps, or make changes to surface features without breaking the model. You may have also wished for a more intuitive and fun way to design organic shapes, similar to modeling with clay.




Power Surfacing For Solidwork 2013 Torrent


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Fortunately, there is a solution that can make your life easier and your designs better. It is called Power Surfacing, a revolutionary add-in that integrates Sub-D (Subdivision Surface) modeling with NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) modeling in SolidWorks. Power Surfacing allows you to create high-quality Class A surfaces with tangent and curvature continuity, using simple push-pull editing and a variety of modeling tools. You can also import and export meshes from other software, such as modo, 3ds Max, Maya, ZBrush, etc., and convert them to SolidWorks features.


In this article, we will introduce you to Power Surfacing for SolidWorks 2013, and show you how it can transform your industrial design process. We will cover the following topics:


  • What is Power Surfacing?



  • How to use Power Surfacing in SolidWorks 2013?



  • What are the main features of Power Surfacing?



  • How to import and export meshes with Power Surfacing?



By the end of this article, you will have a clear understanding of what Power Surfacing can do for you, and how to get started with it. You will also find some FAQs and useful resources at the end.


What is Power Surfacing?




Power Surfacing is an add-in that extends the capabilities of SolidWorks by adding Sub-D modeling technology. Sub-D modeling is a technique that allows you to create smooth and complex shapes by subdividing a coarse mesh into finer ones. You can manipulate the shape by pushing and pulling on the faces, edges, or vertices of the mesh. Sub-D modeling is widely used in the film, game, and animation industries, as well as in industrial design.


Power Surfacing integrates Sub-D modeling with NURBS modeling, which is the native technology of SolidWorks. NURBS modeling is based on mathematical curves and surfaces that can be combined with Boolean and feature operations, as well as refined with filleting, blending, and face editing. NURBS modeling is good for creating precise and parametric shapes.


Power Surfacing combines the best of both worlds by allowing you to create Sub-D shapes in SolidWorks, and convert them to NURBS features that can be edited with SolidWorks commands. You can also use existing SolidWorks sketches or features as references for creating or modifying Sub-D shapes. This way, you can leverage the power of both Sub-D and NURBS in your design process.


The benefits of Sub-D modeling




Sub-D modeling has many benefits for industrial design, such as:


  • It is easy to learn and use compared to traditional surface creation.



  • It allows you to create complex freeform shapes with smooth surfaces.



  • It produces aesthetic surfaces with Class A quality by default.



  • It supports dynamic shape editing using push-pull, soft selection, symmetry, and creasing.



  • It supports multiple levels of detail and resolution.



  • It is compatible with mesh formats from other software.



The advantages of NURBS modeling




NURBS modeling also has many advantages for industrial design, such as:


  • It is accurate and precise for engineering purposes.



  • It allows you to create parametric and associative features that can be modified with dimensions and equations.



  • It supports Boolean and feature operations, such as extrude, revolve, sweep, loft, etc.



  • It supports filleting, blending, and face editing for refining surfaces.



  • It is compatible with SolidWorks commands and tools.



The unification of Sub-D and NURBS with Power Surfacing




Power Surfacing unifies Sub-D and NURBS modeling by allowing you to:


  • Create Sub-D shapes in SolidWorks using a dedicated Power Surfacing tab.



  • Convert Sub-D shapes to NURBS features that can be edited with SolidWorks commands.



  • Use existing SolidWorks sketches or features as references for creating or modifying Sub-D shapes.



  • Import and export meshes from other software and convert them to SolidWorks features.



With Power Surfacing, you can enjoy the flexibility and creativity of Sub-D modeling, as well as the precision and functionality of NURBS modeling. You can create complex freeform shapes with smooth surfaces, and integrate them with your SolidWorks design. You can also import and export meshes from other software, such as modo, 3ds Max, Maya, ZBrush, etc., and convert them to SolidWorks features. Power Surfacing is a powerful tool that can enhance your industrial design process and improve your productivity.


How to use Power Surfacing in SolidWorks 2013?




In this section, we will show you how to use Power Surfacing in SolidWorks 2013. We will cover the following topics:


  • Installing and activating Power Surfacing



  • Creating and editing Power Surfaces



  • Converting Power Surfaces to SolidWorks features



Installing and activating Power Surfacing




To install Power Surfacing, you need to have SolidWorks 2013 or later installed on your computer. You also need to download the Power Surfacing installer from the official website. The installer will guide you through the installation process. You can choose to install Power Surfacing for all users or only for yourself. You can also choose the installation folder and the language of the user interface.


To activate Power Surfacing, you need to have a valid license key that you can purchase from the official website or from an authorized reseller. You can activate Power Surfacing online or offline. To activate online, you need to enter your license key and your email address in the activation dialog box that appears when you launch SolidWorks. To activate offline, you need to generate an activation request file in the activation dialog box, and send it to nPower Software by email. You will receive an activation response file that you need to load in the activation dialog box to complete the activation.


Creating and editing Power Surfaces




To create a Power Surface, you need to go to the Power Surfacing tab in SolidWorks, and click on the Create button. You will see a list of primitive shapes that you can choose from, such as Box, Sphere, Cylinder, Torus, etc. You can also create a Power Surface from a sketch or a mesh by clicking on the From Sketch or From Mesh buttons. Alternatively, you can use the Insert menu or the right-click menu to create a Power Surface.


To edit a Power Surface, you need to select it in the Feature Manager tree or in the graphics area, and click on the Edit button in the Power Surfacing tab. You will enter the Sub-D editing mode, where you can see the control mesh of the Power Surface. You can manipulate the shape by pushing and pulling on the faces, edges, or vertices of the control mesh. You can also use various modeling tools in the Power Surfacing tab, such as Move, Scale, Rotate, Extrude, Bridge, Bevel, etc. You can also use the Soft Selection, Symmetry, and Crease options to modify the shape. You can switch between different levels of detail and resolution by using the Subdivide and Unsubdivide buttons. You can also use the Smooth and Flatten buttons to smooth or flatten the surface.


Converting Power Surfaces to SolidWorks features




To convert a Power Surface to a SolidWorks feature, you need to exit the Sub-D editing mode by clicking on the OK or Cancel button in the Power Surfacing tab. You will see a dialog box that asks you to choose the conversion type. You can choose from three types of conversion:


  • Power Body: This is the default type of conversion that creates a Power Body feature in the Feature Manager tree. A Power Body is a special type of feature that contains both the Sub-D and the NURBS representations of the shape. You can edit the Power Body by double-clicking on it, or by right-clicking and choosing Edit Feature. You can also use SolidWorks commands to modify the Power Body, such as filleting, blending, cutting, etc.



  • Surface Body: This type of conversion creates a Surface Body feature in the Feature Manager tree. A Surface Body is a standard SolidWorks feature that contains only the NURBS representation of the shape. You can edit the Surface Body with SolidWorks commands, such as face editing, knitting, trimming, etc. However, you cannot go back to the Sub-D editing mode once you convert to a Surface Body.



  • Solid Body: This type of conversion creates a Solid Body feature in the Feature Manager tree. A Solid Body is a standard SolidWorks feature that contains only the NURBS representation of the shape, and has a volume enclosed by it. You can edit the Solid Body with SolidWorks commands, such as extruding, revolving, sweeping, lofting, etc. However, you cannot go back to the Sub-D editing mode once you convert to a Solid Body.



You can choose the conversion type that suits your design needs and preferences. You can also change the conversion type later by right-clicking on the feature and choosing Change Conversion Type.


What are the main features of Power Surfacing?




In this section, we will introduce you to some of the main features of Power Surfacing that can help you create amazing shapes in SolidWorks. We will cover the following topics:


  • Primitive shapes and sketches



  • Dynamic push-pull editing and soft selection



  • Basic, intermediate, and advanced modeling tools



Primitive shapes and sketches




One of the easiest ways to start creating a Power Surface is to use one of the primitive shapes that are available in the Power Surfacing tab. You can choose from Box, Sphere, Cylinder, Torus, Cone, Pyramid, etc. You can also create a custom primitive shape by using a sketch or a mesh as a base.


To use a sketch as a base for a Power Surface, you need to create a sketch in SolidWorks first. The sketch can be any closed shape that has four or more sides. Then, you need to go to the Power Surfacing tab and click on the From Sketch button. You will see a dialog box that asks you to select a sketch or an edge loop. You need to select your sketch in the graphics area or in the Feature Manager tree, and click OK. You will see a Power Surface that is created from your sketch. You can edit the Power Surface by using the Sub-D editing mode and the modeling tools.


To use a mesh as a base for a Power Surface, you need to import a mesh from another software first. The mesh can be in any of the supported formats, such as OBJ, STL, FBX, etc. You can import the mesh by using the File menu or the Import Mesh button in the Power Surfacing tab. You will see a dialog box that asks you to select a file and choose some import options. You can adjust the scale, orientation, and units of the mesh. You can also choose to import the mesh as a Power Surface or as a reference mesh. A reference mesh is a mesh that is not editable, but can be used as a guide for creating or modifying a Power Surface. After importing the mesh, you can edit the Power Surface by using the Sub-D editing mode and the modeling tools.


Dynamic push-pull editing and soft selection




One of the most intuitive and fun features of Power Surfacing is the dynamic push-pull editing. This feature allows you to manipulate the shape of a Power Surface by pushing and pulling on its control mesh. You can select one or more faces, edges, or vertices of the control mesh, and drag them with your mouse or use the Move tool in the Power Surfacing tab. You can also use the Scale and Rotate tools to resize and rotate the selected elements. As you edit the control mesh, you will see the smooth surface update in real time.


Another useful feature of Power Surfacing is the soft selection. This feature allows you to affect not only the selected elements of the control mesh, but also their neighboring elements. You can enable or disable the soft selection by clicking on the Soft Selection button in the Power Surfacing tab. You can also adjust the radius and falloff of the soft selection by using the sliders or typing in values. The soft selection is indicated by a color gradient on the control mesh, where red means fully selected, yellow means partially selected, and blue means not selected. The soft selection can help you create smooth transitions and organic shapes.


Basic, intermediate, and advanced modeling tools




Power Surfacing provides a variety of modeling tools that can help you create complex and detailed shapes. These tools are divided into three categories: basic, intermediate, and advanced.


The basic modeling tools are located in the first section of the Power Surfacing tab. These tools include:


  • Move: This tool allows you to move one or more selected elements of the control mesh along a specific axis or plane.



  • Scale: This tool allows you to scale one or more selected elements of the control mesh uniformly or non-uniformly.



  • Rotate: This tool allows you to rotate one or more selected elements of the control mesh around a pivot point.



  • Extrude: This tool allows you to extrude one or more selected faces of the control mesh along a normal or a direction.



  • Bridge: This tool allows you to create a bridge between two selected edge loops of the control mesh.



  • Bevel: This tool allows you to bevel one or more selected edges or vertices of the control mesh by adding new faces.



The intermediate modeling tools are located in the second section of the Power Surfacing tab. These tools include:


  • Insert Loop: This tool allows you to insert a new edge loop on the control mesh by clicking on an existing edge.



  • Delete: This tool allows you to delete one or more selected elements of the control mesh, and fill the resulting hole with new faces.



  • Weld: This tool allows you to weld two or more selected vertices of the control mesh together, and merge the adjacent faces.



  • Split: This tool allows you to split one or more selected edges of the control mesh, and create new vertices.



  • Slide: This tool allows you to slide one or more selected edges or vertices of the control mesh along their neighboring edges.



The advanced modeling tools are located in the third section of the Power Surfacing tab. These tools include:


  • Thicken: This tool allows you to thicken a Power Surface by adding an offset surface and connecting them with side faces.



  • Shell: This tool allows you to shell a Power Surface by removing one or more selected faces and adding an offset surface inside.



  • Subdivide: This tool allows you to subdivide a Power Surface by adding more faces and vertices to the control mesh, and increasing the resolution of the smooth surface.



  • Unsubdivide: This tool allows you to unsubdivide a Power Surface by removing some faces and vertices from the control mesh, and decreasing the resolution of the smooth surface.



  • Smooth: This tool allows you to smooth a Power Surface by averaging the positions of the vertices of the control mesh, and reducing the sharpness of the smooth surface.



  • Flatten: This tool allows you to flatten a Power Surface by projecting the vertices of the control mesh onto a plane, and increasing the sharpness of the smooth surface.



How to import and export meshes with Power Surfacing?




In this section, we will show you how to import and export meshes with Power Surfacing. We will cover the following topics:


  • Importing meshes from other software



  • Exporting meshes to other formats



Importing meshes from other software




If you have a mesh that was created in another software, such as modo, 3ds Max, Maya, ZBrush, etc., you can import it into SolidWorks using Power Surfacing. You can import meshes in any of the supported formats, such as OBJ, STL, FBX, etc. You can import meshes by using the File menu or the Import Mesh button in the Power Surfacing tab. You will see a dialog box that asks you to select a file and choose some import options. You can adjust the scale, orientation, and units of the mesh. You can also choose to import the mesh as a Power Surface or as a reference mesh. A reference mesh is a mesh that is not editable, but can be used as a guide for creating or modifying a Power Surface.


After importing the mesh, you can edit it as a Power Surface by using the Sub-D editing mode and the modeling tools. You can also convert it to a SolidWorks feature by choosing the conversion type. You can also use the existing SolidWorks sketches or features as references for creating or modifying the Power Surface.


Exporting meshes to other formats




If you have a Power Surface that you want to export to another software, such as modo, 3ds Max, Maya, ZBrush, etc., you can export it as a mesh using Power Surfacing. You can export meshes in any of the supported formats, such as OBJ, STL, FBX, etc. You can export meshes by using the File menu or the Export Mesh button in the Power Surfacing tab. You will see a dialog box that asks you to select a file name and choose some export options. You can adjust the scale, orientation, and units of the mesh. You can also choose to export the mesh as a Sub-D mesh or as a NURBS mesh. A Sub-D mesh is a mesh that preserves the control mesh of the Power Surface. A NURBS mesh is a mesh that approximates the smooth surface of the Power Surface.


After exporting the mesh, you can open it in another software and edit it further. You can also import it back into SolidWorks using Power Surfacing if you need to.


Conclusion and FAQs




In this article, we have introduced you to Power Surfacing for SolidWorks 2013, a revolutionary add-in that integrates Sub-D modeling with NURBS modeling in SolidWorks. We have shown you how Power Surfacing can help you create complex freeform shapes with smooth surfaces, and integrate them with your SolidWorks design. We have also shown you how to use Power Surfacing in SolidWorks 2013, and what are the main features of Power Surfacing. We have also shown you how to import and export meshes with Power Surfacing.


We hope that this article has given you a clear understanding of what Power Surfacing can do for you, and how to get started with it. If you are interested in trying out Power Surfacing for yourself, you can download a free trial version from the official website. You can also purchase a full license key from the official website or from an authorized reseller.


If you have any questions or feedback about Power Surfacing, you can contact nPower Software by email or phone. You can also visit their website for more information and resources, such as tutorials, videos, forums, etc.


Here are some FAQs that may help you with Power Surfacing:


  • Q: What are the system requirements for Power Surfacing?



  • A: To run Power Surfacing, you need to have SolidWorks 2013 or later installed on your computer. You also need to have Windows 7 or later as your operating system. You also need to have at least 4 GB of RAM and 1 GB of free disk space.



Q: How much does Power Surfacing cost?


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