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Isaac Richardson
Isaac Richardson

Why Buy Municipal Bonds __HOT__



  • In late 2021, interest rates were rising, and municipal bond rates were rising along with them.As of July 10, 2022, 10-year AAA-rated muni bonds returned 2.60% compared to 2.70% a week earlier. A 20-year AAA-rated bond returned 2.90% compared to 3.00% the week before. A 30-year AAA-rated bond returned 3.05% compared to 3.15% the week before."}},"@type": "Question","name": "Can You Lose Money on Municipal Bonds?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "You can lose the money you invest in municipal bonds if the issuer defaults. That risk is vanishingly small, considering that defaults on municipal bonds reached 0.05% of $3.9 trillion of outstanding debt in 2020, a time during which local tax revenues were decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic.You also could lose money on muni bonds if you are forced to sell the bonds on the secondary market at the wrong time. The price you get will be determined by the total dollar amount of the remaining interest payments due, factoring in the prevailing rates available on new issues.","@type": "Question","name": "Which States and Cities Have the Best Municipal Bonds?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The best muni bonds from any issuer are rated AAA. They are issued by state and local governments nationwide and their bonds have been deemed AAA by one of the major rating agencies. When a government runs into economic trouble, its bond ratings suffer (but it also will pay a better interest rate in order to attract buyers).After its 2013 bankruptcy, the city of Detroit missed payments on three of its general obligation bonds. That means it was responsible for three out of seven defaults on muni bonds rated by Moody's Investors in that year. The city has since managed to work its way back from a "negative" outlook to a "stable" outlook from S&P Global as of January 2021. Its outstanding debt was rated BB-.A bond rated AAA or close to it is one of the best municipal bonds. A bond issued by a local government that is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy is one of the worst. Investors who don't care to keep an eye on the finances of state and local governments they invest in can invest in a bond mutual fund or ETF. It will be managed by someone who gets paid to pay attention to these things.","@type": "Question","name": "Are Municipal Bonds Safe?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "A municipal bond, or any bond for that matter, is safe as long as its issuer does not financially collapse. Luckily, that's highly unlikely in the U.S. bond market.The bond investor's best protection is to take care:Check the bond rating. Defaults are rare, but they happen. A rating of AAA, AA, or A indicates an issuer that is on a sound financial footing.Compare the real return on the municipal bond to other options for your money. It's always nice to save money on taxes but not at the cost of a better return for a comparable risk elsewhere, such as in high-quality corporate bonds."]}]}] Investing Stocks

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why buy municipal bonds


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As of July 10, 2022, 10-year AAA-rated muni bonds returned 2.60% compared to 2.70% a week earlier. A 20-year AAA-rated bond returned 2.90% compared to 3.00% the week before. A 30-year AAA-rated bond returned 3.05% compared to 3.15% the week before.


You can lose the money you invest in municipal bonds if the issuer defaults. That risk is vanishingly small, considering that defaults on municipal bonds reached 0.05% of $3.9 trillion of outstanding debt in 2020, a time during which local tax revenues were decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic.


You also could lose money on muni bonds if you are forced to sell the bonds on the secondary market at the wrong time. The price you get will be determined by the total dollar amount of the remaining interest payments due, factoring in the prevailing rates available on new issues.


The best muni bonds from any issuer are rated AAA. They are issued by state and local governments nationwide and their bonds have been deemed AAA by one of the major rating agencies. When a government runs into economic trouble, its bond ratings suffer (but it also will pay a better interest rate in order to attract buyers).


After its 2013 bankruptcy, the city of Detroit missed payments on three of its general obligation bonds. That means it was responsible for three out of seven defaults on muni bonds rated by Moody's Investors in that year. The city has since managed to work its way back from a "negative" outlook to a "stable" outlook from S&P Global as of January 2021. Its outstanding debt was rated BB-.


A bond rated AAA or close to it is one of the best municipal bonds. A bond issued by a local government that is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy is one of the worst. Investors who don't care to keep an eye on the finances of state and local governments they invest in can invest in a bond mutual fund or ETF. It will be managed by someone who gets paid to pay attention to these things.


In general. higher-income individuals will benefit the most from the tax-free nature of municipal bonds. Furthermore, those living in the locality where the bond is issued can enjoy triple-exemptions from federal, state, and local income taxes."}},"@type": "Question","name": "Are Municipal Bonds Liquid?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Municipal bonds are also relatively liquid, but investors need to be careful of the bid-ask spread. A bid-ask spread of just 1% can substantially reduce the returns of a muni bond yielding 2%.One solution is to invest in a municipal bond mutual fund, but you must be sure the fund is no load. A high load fee can be just as bad as a high bid-ask spread.Muni bond ETFs are another potential solution. However, the bid-ask spread can also be high for low-volume ETFs. The best muni ETFs usually have low bid-ask spreads.","@type": "Question","name": "What Are Some Downsides of Muni Bonds?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Investors should take note of some of the drawbacks or limitations of investing in municipal bonds. First, while the interest you receive from muni bonds is free from federal taxes there may still be state and local taxes depending on where you reside and where the bond was issued.The interest rate paid on muni bonds is also often quite a bit lower than rates offered on corporate bonds, so be sure to check the taxable equivalent yields before deciding which is better after-tax.Finally, if you receive Social Security, your bond interest will be counted as income in calculating the taxable amount of your Social Security income. That could increase the amount you owe."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsTax Advantages of Municipal BondsLower Default RatesTypes of Municipal BondsMuni Bond ETFsFAQsThe Bottom LineBondsMunicipal BondsAre Municipal Bonds a Good Investment?A Look at the Pros and Cons of Muni Bonds 041b061a72


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