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Luke Bell
Luke Bell

Buy Flax Oil ##HOT##


Most nutrition experts recommend ground over whole flaxseed because the ground form is easier to digest. Whole flaxseed may pass through your intestine undigested, which means you won't get all the benefits.




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Flaxseed's health benefits come from the fact that it's high in fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, as well as phytochemicals called lignans. One tablespoon (7 grams) of ground flaxseed contains 2 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids (includes the omega 3s), 2 grams of dietary fiber and 37 calories.


Like other sources of fiber, flaxseed should be taken with plenty of water or other fluids. Flaxseed shouldn't be taken at the same time as oral medications. As always, talk with your doctor before trying any dietary supplements.


Linseed oil, also known as flaxseed oil, is one of the most popular wood finishes in the world. Like other hand-rubbed oil finishes, linseed oil saturates deep into the wood grain to protect against scratches and changes in humidity. It is easy to care for, eco-friendly, and produces a satin finish that really brings out the color and grain of the wood underneath.


As discussed above, linseed oil comes in different varieties. Raw, polymerized, and boiled linseed oil are all derived from the flaxseed plant, but have been processed differently and to varying degrees. As a wood finish, linseed oil often gets compared to danish oil and tung oil.


Yes and no. Flaxseed oil can be added to smoothies, used in salad dressings, or drizzled on vegetables after cooking. But you should not heat flaxseed oil, or it will become rancid, lose its nutritional properties, and taste bitter.


Yadav RK, Singh M, Roy S, Ansari MN, Saeedan AS, Kaithwas G. Modulation of oxidative stress response by flaxseed oil: Role of lipid peroxidation and underlying mechanisms. Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2018;135:21-26. doi:10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2018.02.003


Ren GY, Chen CY, Chen GC, et al. Effect of flaxseed intervention on inflammatory marker C-reactive protein: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrients. 2016;8(3):136. doi:10.3390/nu8030136


Tamtaji OR, Milajerdi A, Reiner Ž, et al. Effects of flaxseed oil supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2020;40:27-33. doi:10.1016/j.clnesp.2020.09.017


Ramos CI, Andrade de Lima AF, Grilli DG, Cuppari L. The short-term effects of olive oil and flaxseed oil for the treatment of constipation in hemodialysis patients. J Ren Nutr. 2015;25(1):50-6. doi:10.1053/j.jrn.2014.07.009


Morshedzadeh N, Shahrokh S, Aghdaei HA, et al. Effects of flaxseed and flaxseed oil supplement on serum levels of inflammatory markers, metabolic parameters and severity of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis. Complement Ther Med. 2019;46:36-43. doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2019.07.012


Mahmudiono T, Jasim SA, Karim YS, et al. The effect of flaxseed oil consumtion on blood pressure among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Phytother Res. 2022;36(10):3766-3773. doi:10.1002/ptr.7566


Raygan F, Taghizadeh M, Mirhosseini N, et al. A comparison between the effects of flaxseed oil and fish oil supplementation on cardiovascular health in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Phytother Res. 2019;33(7):1943-1951. doi:10.1002/ptr.6393


The health benefits of fish oil are believed to derive principally from two omega-3 fats, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Flaxseed oil contains a third, plant-based omega-3, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Other foods (especially walnuts) and oils (canola and soybean, for example) contain ALA. But at about 7 grams per tablespoon, flaxseed oil is by far the richest source.


Flaxseed oil will give your diet a nice little omega-3 boost in the form of alpha-linolenic acid. You might try adding flaxseed oil to your salad dressing. But flaxseed oils a backup, not a substitute, for the omega-3s in fish and fish oil because of the conversion factor. If you're in need of omega-3s but are concerned about mercury, salmon, pollock, and catfish are all low in mercury. And canned light tuna tends to be lower in mercury than albacore ("white") tuna.


Flaxseed oil contains 50 to 60 percent Omega-3 fatty acids in the form of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). It is low in saturated fatty acids, moderate in monounsaturated fatty acids and rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Research suggests that flax seed oil has potential health benefits related to cardiovascular disease, cancer, prostate problems, inflammation, digestive issues and osteoporosis.


Flaxseed was cultivated in Babylon as early as 3000 BC. In the 8th century, King Charlemagne believed so strongly in the health benefits of flaxseed that he passed laws requiring his subjects to consume it. Now, thirteen centuries later, some experts say we have preliminary research to back up what Charlemagne suspected.


Flaxseed is found in all kinds of today's foods from crackers to frozen waffles to oatmeal. The Flax Council estimates close to 300 new flax-based products were launched in the U.S. and Canada in 2010 alone. Not only has consumer demand for flaxseed grown, agricultural use has also increased. Flaxseed is what's used to feed all those chickens that are laying eggs with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids.


Recent studies have suggested that flaxseed may have a protective effect against breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer. At least two of the components in flaxseed seem to contribute, says Kelley C. Fitzpatrick, director of health and nutrition with the Flax Council of Canada.


The lignans in flaxseed may provide some protection against cancers that are sensitive to hormones without interfering with the breast cancer drug tamoxifen. Thompson says some studies have suggested that exposure to lignans during adolescence helps reduce the risk of breast cancer and may also increase the survival of breast cancer patients.


Research suggests that plant omega-3s help the cardiovascular system through several different mechanisms, including anti-inflammatory action and normalizing the heartbeat. Fitzpatrick says new research also suggests significant blood pressure-lowering effects of flaxseed. Those effects may be due to both the omega-3 fatty acids as well as the amino acid groups found in flaxseed.


Eating flaxseed daily may also help your cholesterol levels. The level of LDL or "bad" cholesterol in the bloodstream has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. A study of menopausal women showed a decrease in LDL level after the women ate 4 tablespoons of ground flaxseed each day for a year. Fitzpatrick says the cholesterol-lowering effects of flaxseed are the result of the combined benefits of the omega-3 ALA, fiber, and lignans.


Two components in flaxseed, ALA and lignans, may reduce the inflammation that accompanies certain illnesses (such as Parkinson's disease and asthma) by helping block the release of certain pro-inflammatory agents, Fitzpatrick says.


One study of menopausal women, published in 2007, reported that 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed mixed into cereal, juice, or yogurt twice a day cut their hot flashes in half. The intensity of their hot flashes also dropped by 57%. The women noticed a difference after taking the daily flaxseed for just one week and achieved the maximum benefit within two weeks.


But another study reported no significant reduction in hot flashes between postmenopausal women and breast cancer patients eating a bar containing 410 milligrams of phytoestrogens from ground flaxseed and women eating a placebo bar.


"Our own animal studies showed that flaxseed exposure during these stages may be protective against breast cancer in the offspring. But a study of another investigator showed the opposite effect," Thompson says.


Thompson says, "Ground flaxseed, in general, is a great first choice, but there may be specific situations where flax oil or the lignans (taken in amounts naturally found in flaxseed) might be as good."


How much flaxseed do you need? The optimum dose to obtain health benefits is not yet known. But 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed a day is currently the suggested dose, according to the Flax Council of Canada.


Cultivated in cooler climates that include the Northern United States and Canada, flax is an annual plant that produces beautiful, delicate blue flowers. In addition to the plant's highly nutritive seeds, flax also possesses strong, fibrous stems that have been used for thousands of years in the production of linen textiles. The words linen and linseed are derived from the Latin genus Linum, meaning "thread." The species name usitatissimum means "most useful."


Different processes are used to produce Flax Seed Oil/Linseed Oil, and it's especially important to ensure that oil sourced for nutritive and topical applications is cold pressed, unrefined and ideally organic. Oil that is cold pressed from the seeds of organic Linum usitatissimum is most commonly, but not always, referred to as Organic Virgin Flax Seed Oil. Oils that undergo various forms of heating, refinement and deodorization are typically referred to as Linseed Oil. Heated and refined flax seed/linseed oils are not well suited for use within beauty, cosmetic and personal care applications.


Flaxseed oil comes from the seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum, L.). Flaxseed oil contains both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which are needed for health. Flaxseed oil contains the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which the body converts into eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil. Some researchers think flaxseed oil might have some of the same benefits as fish oil. But the body is not very efficient at converting ALA into EPA and DHA. The benefits of ALA, EPA, and DHA are not necessarily the same. Omega-3 fatty acids, usually from fish oil, have been shown to reduce inflammation and help prevent certain chronic diseases, such as heart disease and arthritis. Studies are mixed about whether flaxseed oil is useful for the same conditions. 041b061a72


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